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Posts tagged art:

#01 is a dance improvisation based on two dancers sharing their experiences and ideas through movements. While weaving in and out of spaces, they meet, share, merge, communicate and influence each other.

At times they might be telling stories, sometimes they might be more abstract, most importantly, they will be sharing the journey of seeking and having fun through the process.
What: Performance/Dance
Where: Brisbane Powerhouse Plaza
When: Saturday 29 October 2011: 14.00 – 14.30


www.fenlan.com.au and www.lieselzink.com via  kusamapyjamas via FenLan Chuang and Leisel Zink: #01 « Backbone Youth Arts

#01 is a dance improvisation based on two dancers sharing their experiences and ideas through movements. While weaving in and out of spaces, they meet, share, merge, communicate and influence each other.

At times they might be telling stories, sometimes they might be more abstract, most importantly, they will be sharing the journey of seeking and having fun through the process.

What: Performance/Dance

Where: Brisbane Powerhouse Plaza

When: Saturday 29 October 2011: 14.00 – 14.30

www.fenlan.com.au and www.lieselzink.com via  kusamapyjamas via FenLan Chuang and Leisel Zink: #01 « Backbone Youth Arts


Canadian artist Sean Martindale. Sean used 21,633 feet of nylon twine recovered to write the word “FREE” between two fences. (via) gaksdesigns

(via dreamhampton1)

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Shadow Piece, 1966

Pictured, Yoko Ono and Barbara Stevini

Shadow Piece, performed at the Destruction in Art Symposium in London, 1966, consisted of Yoko tracing the bodies of twenty participants on a long cloth on the Free School Playground, which was bombed during World War II and still littered with debris.

fuckyeahyokoono

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Shadow Piece, 1966

Pictured, Yoko Ono and Barbara Stevini

Shadow Piece, performed at the Destruction in Art Symposium in London, 1966, consisted of Yoko tracing the bodies of twenty participants on a long cloth on the Free School Playground, which was bombed during World War II and still littered with debris.

fuckyeahyokoono

Al Akhbar | Leila Khaled in Lipstick: Changing Representations of Palestinian Women


 

Birzeit University is hosting a unique exhibition of works by Palestinian artists dating from the 1970s through to the present. Framed-Unframed is a critical exploration of visual artists’ changing representations of Palestinian women.

Acre - Leila Khaled hijacked an American airplane on 29 August 1969. After the operation, the photograph of the famous revolutionary taken by Eddie Adams turned Khaled into an icon. Khaled, a young brunette carrying a Kalashnikov with a kuffiyeh around her neck, became a symbol of an era. Images of Khaled and other icons of the seventies are reproduced at Framed-Unramed, an exhibition at the Ethnographic and Art Museum, in partnership with the Institute of Women’s Studies at Birzeit University.

The exhibition portrays various representations of women in Palestinian art through the work of Palestinian artists from different schools and generations whose art spans from the 1970s to the present day. The artists include: Suleiman Mansour, Mona Hatoum, Nabil Anani, Kamel al-Moghanni, Burhan Karkutli, Naji al-Ali, Ahlam Shibli, Mary Tuma, Amer Shomali, Raeda Saadeh, Laila Shawa, Samira Badran, Layan Shawabka, Vera Tamari, Rula Halawani, Inass Yassine, Ayman Issa and Hani Zurob.

Yassine, co-director of the exhibition (along with Vera Tamari), told al-Akhbar that they chose not to select artworks directly addressing feminist issues. “The focus was on the various forms of representation of women in the past thirty years,” she explained.

The exhibition is divided into four sections. The first section, “In the Frame of Heroism”, includes artwork from the seventies. This period set the stage for representations of Palestinian women as icons of struggle and revolution. Palestinian women were portrayed as symbols of land, devotion, and the nation. This is displayed in Suleiman Mansour’s artworks Palestine and The Awakening of the Village (1978), Naji al-Ali’s portrait Fatima (1970), in addition to untitled pieces by Burhan Karkutli and Kamel al-Moghanni from the mid-1970s. It also includes Two Girls from Bethlehem (2011), a modern artwork by Nabil Anani, which preserves some of the symbolism of the seventies.

Read more at Al Akhbar
charquaouia

Al Akhbar | Leila Khaled in Lipstick: Changing Representations of Palestinian Women

Birzeit University is hosting a unique exhibition of works by Palestinian artists dating from the 1970s through to the present. Framed-Unframed is a critical exploration of visual artists’ changing representations of Palestinian women.

Acre - Leila Khaled hijacked an American airplane on 29 August 1969. After the operation, the photograph of the famous revolutionary taken by Eddie Adams turned Khaled into an icon. Khaled, a young brunette carrying a Kalashnikov with a kuffiyeh around her neck, became a symbol of an era. Images of Khaled and other icons of the seventies are reproduced at Framed-Unramed, an exhibition at the Ethnographic and Art Museum, in partnership with the Institute of Women’s Studies at Birzeit University.

The exhibition portrays various representations of women in Palestinian art through the work of Palestinian artists from different schools and generations whose art spans from the 1970s to the present day. The artists include: Suleiman Mansour, Mona Hatoum, Nabil Anani, Kamel al-Moghanni, Burhan Karkutli, Naji al-Ali, Ahlam Shibli, Mary Tuma, Amer Shomali, Raeda Saadeh, Laila Shawa, Samira Badran, Layan Shawabka, Vera Tamari, Rula Halawani, Inass Yassine, Ayman Issa and Hani Zurob.

Yassine, co-director of the exhibition (along with Vera Tamari), told al-Akhbar that they chose not to select artworks directly addressing feminist issues. “The focus was on the various forms of representation of women in the past thirty years,” she explained.

The exhibition is divided into four sections. The first section, “In the Frame of Heroism”, includes artwork from the seventies. This period set the stage for representations of Palestinian women as icons of struggle and revolution. Palestinian women were portrayed as symbols of land, devotion, and the nation. This is displayed in Suleiman Mansour’s artworks Palestine and The Awakening of the Village (1978), Naji al-Ali’s portrait Fatima (1970), in addition to untitled pieces by Burhan Karkutli and Kamel al-Moghanni from the mid-1970s. It also includes Two Girls from Bethlehem (2011), a modern artwork by Nabil Anani, which preserves some of the symbolism of the seventies.

Read more at Al Akhbar

charquaouia

(via kusamapyjamas)

BREAKING: Sotheby’s Hiring Crozier Fine Arts to Cross Pick Line? Teamster Fighting Back

Teamsters representatives have been circulating a letter to Chelsea galleries indicating that they will be protesting jobs by Crozier Fine Arts, who they say have crossed their picket line by partly replaced their workers at Sotheby’s. The Teamster are finding back and threatening to protest all future jobs by Crozier. READ MORE
hyperallergic

BREAKING: Sotheby’s Hiring Crozier Fine Arts to Cross Pick Line? Teamster Fighting Back

Teamsters representatives have been circulating a letter to Chelsea galleries indicating that they will be protesting jobs by Crozier Fine Arts, who they say have crossed their picket line by partly replaced their workers at Sotheby’s. The Teamster are finding back and threatening to protest all future jobs by Crozier. READ MORE

hyperallergic

3rdofmay:

The art: Fritz Haeg, Edible Estate for Baltimore, ~2008. Click here to read about and see more of this particular Haeg Edible Estate. Downright inspiring. 

The news: “Shares Meals, Shared Knowledge,” by Mark Bittman on the New York Times op-ed page. 

The source: Fritz Haeg’s website, the Baltimore Contemporary.

3rdofmay:

The art: Fritz Haeg, Edible Estate for Baltimore, ~2008. Click here to read about and see more of this particular Haeg Edible Estate. Downright inspiring. 

The news: “Shares Meals, Shared Knowledge,” by Mark Bittman on the New York Times op-ed page. 

The source: Fritz Haeg’s website, the Baltimore Contemporary.

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Photograph by George Maciunas, intended as a poster for Yoko’s 1961 Carnegie Recital Hall performance but unused.
fuckyeahyokoono

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Photograph by George Maciunas, intended as a poster for Yoko’s 1961 Carnegie Recital Hall performance but unused.

fuckyeahyokoono

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Yoko Ono participating in the Japanese art group Hi Red Center’s Shelter Plan, 1964. Shelter Plan was a work that consisted of the creation of personalized nuclear fall-out shelters. fuckyeahyokoono

Scanned from YES YOKO ONO by Alexandra Munroe and Jon Hendricks

Yoko Ono participating in the Japanese art group Hi Red Center’s Shelter Plan, 1964. Shelter Plan was a work that consisted of the creation of personalized nuclear fall-out shelters. fuckyeahyokoono

fyeahwomenartists:

The Gap Campaign, 1991
Set of six xerox posters

DAM!’s first poster project was a straight-forward effort to expose the lack of lesbian representation in American popular culture. The project highlighted the fact that for one to “exist” or be visible in mainstream media, one must belong to a recognizable consumer group. The campaign replaced the “underground” celebrities featured in the GAP ads with pictures of lesbian activists. “ 

(via fyeahwomenartists)

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