fyahblaze:

blackfeminism:

ourtimeorg:

If you don’t know who Johnnie Tillmon was, look her up.

Welfare is a Women’s Issue (1972) by Johnnie Tillmon
I’m a woman. I’m a black woman. I’m a poor woman. I’m a fat woman. I’m a middle-aged woman. And I’m on welfare.
In this country, if you’re any one of those things you count less as a human being. If you’re all those things, you don’t count at all. Except as a statistic.
I am 45 years old. I have raised six children. There are millions of statistics like me. Some on welfare. Some not. And some, really poor, who don’t even know they’re entitled to welfare. Not all of them are black. Not at all. In fact, the majority-about two-thirds-of all the poor families in the country are white.
Welfare’s like a traffic accident. It can happen to anybody, but especially it happens to women.
And that’s why welfare is a women’s issue. For a lot of middle-class women in this country, Women’s Liberation is a matter of concern. For women on welfare it’s a matter of survival.
Survival. That’s why we had to go on welfare. And that’s why we can’t get off welfare now. Not us women. Not until we do something about liberating poor women in this country.
Because up until now we’ve been raised to expect to work, all our lives, for nothing. Because we are the worst educated, the least-skilled, and the lowest-paid people there are. Because we have to be almost totally responsible for our children. Because we are regarded by everybody as dependents. That’s why we are on welfare. And that’s why we stay on it.
Welfare is the most prejudiced institution in this country, even more than marriage, which it tries to imitate. Let me explain that a little.
Ninety-nine percent of welfare families are headed by women. There is no man around. In half the states there can’t be men around because A.F.D.C. (Aid to Families With Dependent Children) says if there is an “able-bodied” man around, then you can’t be on welfare. If the kids are going to eat, and the man can’t get a job, then he’s got to go.
Welfare is like a super-sexist marriage. You trade in a man for the man. But you can’t divorce him if he treats you bad. He can divorce you, of course, cut you off anytime he wants. But in that case, he keeps the kids, not you.The man runs everything. In ordinary marriage, sex is supposed to be for your husband. On A.F.D.C., you’re not supposed to have any sex at all. You give up control of your own body. It’s a condition of aid. You may even have to agree to get your tubes tied so you can never have more children just to avoid being cut off welfare.
The man, the welfare system, controls your money. He tells you what to buy, what not to buy, where to buy it, and how much things cost. If things-rent, for instance-really cost more than he says they do, it’s just too bad for you. He’s always right.
That’s why Governor [Ronald] Reagan can get away with slandering welfare recipients, calling them “lazy parasites,” “pigs at the trough,” and such. We’ve been trained to believe that the only reason people are on welfare is because there’s something wrong with their character. If people have “motivation,” if people only want to work, they can, and they will be able to support themselves and their kids in decency.
The truth is a job doesn’t necessarily mean an adequate income. There are some ten million jobs that now pay less than the minimum wage, and if you’re a woman, you’ve got the best chance of getting one. Why would a 45-year-old woman work all day in a laundry ironing shirts at 90-some cents an hour? Because she knows there’s some place lower she could be. She could be on welfare. Society needs women on welfare as “examples” to let every woman, factory workers and housewife workers alike, know what will happen if she lets up, if she’s laid off, if she tries to go it alone without a man. So these ladies stay on their feet or on their knees all their lives instead of asking why they’re only getting 90-some cents an hour, instead of daring to fight and complain.
Maybe we poor welfare women will really liberate women in this country. We’ve already started on our own welfare plan. Along with other welfare recipients, we have organized so we can have some voice. Our group is called the National Welfare Rights Organization (N.W.R.O.). We put together our own welfare plan, called Guaranteed Adequate Income (G.A.I.), which would eliminate sexism from welfare. There would be no “categories”-men, women, children, single, married, kids, no kids-just poor people who need aid. You’d get paid according to need and family size only and that would be upped as the cost of living goes up.
As far as I’m concerned, the ladies of N.W.R.O. are the front-line troops of women’s freedom. Both because we have so few illusions and because our issues are so important to all women-the right to a living wage for women’s work, the right to life itself.

still relevant today

fyahblaze:

blackfeminism:

ourtimeorg:

If you don’t know who Johnnie Tillmon was, look her up.

Welfare is a Women’s Issue (1972) by Johnnie Tillmon

I’m a woman. I’m a black woman. I’m a poor woman. I’m a fat woman. I’m a middle-aged woman. And I’m on welfare.

In this country, if you’re any one of those things you count less as a human being. If you’re all those things, you don’t count at all. Except as a statistic.

I am 45 years old. I have raised six children. There are millions of statistics like me. Some on welfare. Some not. And some, really poor, who don’t even know they’re entitled to welfare. Not all of them are black. Not at all. In fact, the majority-about two-thirds-of all the poor families in the country are white.

Welfare’s like a traffic accident. It can happen to anybody, but especially it happens to women.

And that’s why welfare is a women’s issue. For a lot of middle-class women in this country, Women’s Liberation is a matter of concern. For women on welfare it’s a matter of survival.

Survival. That’s why we had to go on welfare. And that’s why we can’t get off welfare now. Not us women. Not until we do something about liberating poor women in this country.

Because up until now we’ve been raised to expect to work, all our lives, for nothing. Because we are the worst educated, the least-skilled, and the lowest-paid people there are. Because we have to be almost totally responsible for our children. Because we are regarded by everybody as dependents. That’s why we are on welfare. And that’s why we stay on it.

Welfare is the most prejudiced institution in this country, even more than marriage, which it tries to imitate. Let me explain that a little.

Ninety-nine percent of welfare families are headed by women. There is no man around. In half the states there can’t be men around because A.F.D.C. (Aid to Families With Dependent Children) says if there is an “able-bodied” man around, then you can’t be on welfare. If the kids are going to eat, and the man can’t get a job, then he’s got to go.

Welfare is like a super-sexist marriage. You trade in a man for the man. But you can’t divorce him if he treats you bad. He can divorce you, of course, cut you off anytime he wants. But in that case, he keeps the kids, not you.The man runs everything. In ordinary marriage, sex is supposed to be for your husband. On A.F.D.C., you’re not supposed to have any sex at all. You give up control of your own body. It’s a condition of aid. You may even have to agree to get your tubes tied so you can never have more children just to avoid being cut off welfare.

The man, the welfare system, controls your money. He tells you what to buy, what not to buy, where to buy it, and how much things cost. If things-rent, for instance-really cost more than he says they do, it’s just too bad for you. He’s always right.

That’s why Governor [Ronald] Reagan can get away with slandering welfare recipients, calling them “lazy parasites,” “pigs at the trough,” and such. We’ve been trained to believe that the only reason people are on welfare is because there’s something wrong with their character. If people have “motivation,” if people only want to work, they can, and they will be able to support themselves and their kids in decency.

The truth is a job doesn’t necessarily mean an adequate income. There are some ten million jobs that now pay less than the minimum wage, and if you’re a woman, you’ve got the best chance of getting one. Why would a 45-year-old woman work all day in a laundry ironing shirts at 90-some cents an hour? Because she knows there’s some place lower she could be. She could be on welfare. Society needs women on welfare as “examples” to let every woman, factory workers and housewife workers alike, know what will happen if she lets up, if she’s laid off, if she tries to go it alone without a man. So these ladies stay on their feet or on their knees all their lives instead of asking why they’re only getting 90-some cents an hour, instead of daring to fight and complain.

Maybe we poor welfare women will really liberate women in this country. We’ve already started on our own welfare plan. Along with other welfare recipients, we have organized so we can have some voice. Our group is called the National Welfare Rights Organization (N.W.R.O.). We put together our own welfare plan, called Guaranteed Adequate Income (G.A.I.), which would eliminate sexism from welfare. There would be no “categories”-men, women, children, single, married, kids, no kids-just poor people who need aid. You’d get paid according to need and family size only and that would be upped as the cost of living goes up.

As far as I’m concerned, the ladies of N.W.R.O. are the front-line troops of women’s freedom. Both because we have so few illusions and because our issues are so important to all women-the right to a living wage for women’s work, the right to life itself.

still relevant today

(via lawd-knows)

asymptotejournal:

“Ultimately, literature is nothing but carpentry. With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood.”
Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez has just passed away at the age of 87. 1927 - 2014

asymptotejournal:

Ultimately, literature is nothing but carpentry. With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood.”

Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez has just passed away at the age of 87. 
1927 - 2014


3pm Saturday, 19 April 2014
allgo/Red Salmon Arts presents:  Research for Action, Action for Change: A Community Dialogue
This community dialogue will begin with its starting point discussing the two papers David Glisch-Sánchez has written as a part of allgo's Brown Paper Series (the papers can be found electronically on the allgo website, hard copies will be available at the event). The papers were inspired by and draw upon the details and subsequent lessons learned from the tragic murders of Norma & María Hurtado in April 2011. Using these papers as a starting point we will discuss the daily social harms queer folks of color face.  The dialogue will end with a consideration of what are practical strategies for social transformation that results in tangible increases in safety for queer communities of color.


1pm Saturday, 26 April 2014
Red Salmon Arts presents:  Barrio Writers of Austin Live Reading
The students featured in the collections have attended writing workshops from various surrounding schools in Austin, TX & Orange County, CA.  Please join us in supporting our youth and showing the world that regardless of the obstacles and stereotypes placed on our teens, they find a way to have a voice and teach us all life lessons.


 
5:30 pm Thursday, 1 May 2014
International Workers’ Day/Día del Trabajo 2014! We’re having a May Day celebration with music, poetry, soapbox speeches, shared literature tables, film clips, food, an art clothesline, and official web launch for Austin Beloved Community! In other words big and chaotic with as much participation as we can get from all the organizations and people involved. All working class poets, musicians, artists, cooks, organizers, activists and everyone else is invited to come and participate in celebration and solidarity. 
Día del Trabajo 2014! Estamos planeando celebrar el Dia del Trabajo con musica, poesia, discursos, literatura, comida y el lanzamiento oficial de nuestra pagina web Austin Beloved Community (Nuestra Querida Comunidad de Austin)! En otras palabras una celebracion grande y caotica, con la participacion de muchas organizaciones y personas involucradas. Tod@s l@s poetas, musicos, artistas, cocineros, organizadores, activistas y demas personas estan invitadas a participar en esta celebracion en solidaridad.Estamos planeando tener un area de actuacion. Si eres musico o poeta interesado en ofrecer tu musica o poesia favor de enviar un mensaje a austinbelovedcommunity.info@gmail.com para reservar tu lugar. Tendremos comida de “traje”, asi que puedes traer algun platillo para compartir, si quieres.Mas informacion: www.austinbelovedcommunity.org
salmonrojo:

3pm Saturday, 19 April 2014

allgo/Red Salmon Arts presents:  Research for Action, Action for Change: A Community Dialogue

This community dialogue will begin with its starting point discussing the two papers David Glisch-Sánchez has written as a part of allgo's Brown Paper Series (the papers can be found electronically on the allgo website, hard copies will be available at the event). The papers were inspired by and draw upon the details and subsequent lessons learned from the tragic murders of Norma & María Hurtado in April 2011. Using these papers as a starting point we will discuss the daily social harms queer folks of color face.  The dialogue will end with a consideration of what are practical strategies for social transformation that results in tangible increases in safety for queer communities of color.


1pm Saturday, 26 April 2014

Red Salmon Arts presents:  Barrio Writers of Austin Live Reading

The students featured in the collections have attended writing workshops from various surrounding schools in Austin, TX & Orange County, CA.  Please join us in supporting our youth and showing the world that regardless of the obstacles and stereotypes placed on our teens, they find a way to have a voice and teach us all life lessons.


 

5:30 pm Thursday, 1 May 2014

International Workers’ Day/Día del Trabajo 2014!

We’re having a May Day celebration with music, poetry, soapbox speeches, shared literature tables, film clips, food, an art clothesline, and official web launch for Austin Beloved Community! In other words big and chaotic with as much participation as we can get from all the organizations and people involved. All working class poets, musicians, artists, cooks, organizers, activists and everyone else is invited to come and participate in celebration and solidarity.

Día del Trabajo 2014!

Estamos planeando celebrar el Dia del Trabajo con musica, poesia, discursos, literatura, comida y el lanzamiento oficial de nuestra pagina web Austin Beloved Community (Nuestra Querida Comunidad de Austin)! En otras palabras una celebracion grande y caotica, con la participacion de muchas organizaciones y personas involucradas. Tod@s l@s poetas, musicos, artistas, cocineros, organizadores, activistas y demas personas estan invitadas a participar en esta celebracion en solidaridad.

Estamos planeando tener un area de actuacion. Si eres musico o poeta interesado en ofrecer tu musica o poesia favor de enviar un mensaje a austinbelovedcommunity.info@gmail.com para reservar tu lugar. Tendremos comida de “traje”, asi que puedes traer algun platillo para compartir, si quieres.

Mas informacion: www.austinbelovedcommunity.org

salmonrojo:

centerforartandthought:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: STORM: A HAIYAN RECOVERY PROJECT!
CA+T announces a call for entries to its next curated exhibition, Storm: A Haiyan Recovery Project, to premier on CA+T’s website in November 2014. Storm welcomes artistic and scholarly works in all media that consider the social history, cultural politics, and symbolic dimensions of Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda. The deadline for submissions is August 1.
Follow the link below for more details and spread the word!
http://centerforartandthought.org/news/call-submissions-cats-next-virtual-exhibition-storm-haiyan-recovery-project

centerforartandthought:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: STORM: A HAIYAN RECOVERY PROJECT!

CA+T announces a call for entries to its next curated exhibition, Storm: A Haiyan Recovery Project, to premier on CA+T’s website in November 2014. Storm welcomes artistic and scholarly works in all media that consider the social history, cultural politics, and symbolic dimensions of Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda. The deadline for submissions is August 1.

Follow the link below for more details and spread the word!

http://centerforartandthought.org/news/call-submissions-cats-next-virtual-exhibition-storm-haiyan-recovery-project

schdy:
It is every workers legal right to unionize. Adjunct faculty at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) are unionizing to ensure job security, proportional access to benefits, compensation that equitably reflects the value of their teaching, and legal protection against unfair dismissal or discipline. Ballots have gone out to adjunct faculty and voting has begun. The only people allowed to vote, are the adjunct faculty who would be members of the union.
Our administration continues to send intimidating union busting emails to the adjunct faculty to persuade them to vote no. 
On Friday, April 4th a group of students hand delivered a petition from the MICA community asking President Fred Lazarus to listen to his community and halt efforts to union bust and remain neutral as voting begins. On Monday April 7th, President Fred Lazarus responded in a follow up email stating that he will not remain neutral on this issue.
why this is important as a student :
we all have a high chance of becoming adjunct faculty one day and would want to be treated fairly
tuition rises every hear and adjunct faculty have not received a raise since the 1990’s. if our tuition is not directly going to the people facilitating our education, where is it going? 
one of the petition testimonials says it best:
" [ I support the adjunct union ] Because artists are generally undermined, undervalued, and underpaid in our society - if we cannot respect and treat artists fairly within art institutions, how can we expect to be respected and valued elsewhere?”
questions, inquires, want to be part of the organizing action? email micassau@gmail.com 

schdy:

It is every workers legal right to unionize. Adjunct faculty at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) are unionizing to ensure job security, proportional access to benefits, compensation that equitably reflects the value of their teaching, and legal protection against unfair dismissal or discipline. Ballots have gone out to adjunct faculty and voting has begun. The only people allowed to vote, are the adjunct faculty who would be members of the union.

Our administration continues to send intimidating union busting emails to the adjunct faculty to persuade them to vote no. 

On Friday, April 4th a group of students hand delivered a petition from the MICA community asking President Fred Lazarus to listen to his community and halt efforts to union bust and remain neutral as voting begins. On Monday April 7th, President Fred Lazarus responded in a follow up email stating that he will not remain neutral on this issue.

why this is important as a student :

  • we all have a high chance of becoming adjunct faculty one day and would want to be treated fairly

  • tuition rises every hear and adjunct faculty have not received a raise since the 1990’s. if our tuition is not directly going to the people facilitating our education, where is it going? 

one of the petition testimonials says it best:

" [ I support the adjunct union ] Because artists are generally undermined, undervalued, and underpaid in our society - if we cannot respect and treat artists fairly within art institutions, how can we expect to be respected and valued elsewhere?”

questions, inquires, want to be part of the organizing action? email micassau@gmail.com